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Guest Blog: Endometriosis, hysterectomy and fistula

“For the first time in the majority of my adult life I wasn’t reliant on pain killers”

I’m really pleased to be able to bring you Jane’s story, in her own words. I’m incredibly proud of how far she’s come and how well she’s doing. It takes great emotional resilience to overcome the challenges she’ll tell you all about. If you’ve got Endometriosis or know someone who has, please share her story. Well timed Pelvic Health Physio can help people to avoid surgery by improving painful symptoms, and will always also support them through their complex surgical recovery to regain their lives.

 

Jane

Where to begin? Well, in the words of Julie Andrews, let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.

I always had very heavy periods but I was told that periods hurt, it’s normal, just take some painkillers and just get on with it. Which I did. I didn’t really let it bother me, but as I grew...

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Guest blog: My postnatal body and me, prolapse and recovery

I’m very happy to be able to share Beth’s story with you, in her words. Her delivery and 4th trimester issues are common, as was her need for greater support at that time. The fact that we were able to provide the help she needed at that vital time makes me very proud. It’s a testament to everything I’ve worked toward as a Pelvic Health Physio, and demonstrates how I believe we can provide truly holistic and individualised care that changes lives. I’m so proud of how far she has come on her rehab journey, it’s not been easy. I’ll let Beth tell you…

I’ve had writers block for a couple of weeks since confirming that I would write a blog to share my story.

Where to begin?

How much to share?

Does writing it down make everything a bit too real?

You see, I’m still on my journey to recovery so I can’t tell a story of ‘happily ever after’ just yet. However, what I can tell you is a story of hope and amazing...

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A quick guide to the what and why of Interstitial Cystitis / Bladder Pain Syndrome

What is Bladder Pain Syndrome?

The first thing to say about Bladder Pain Syndrome is what it’s Not….

Initially people went to their doctors with the symptoms of a chronic infection – a urinary tract infection or cystitis. They had an urgent need to pass urine, felt like they needed to go often and it would be accompanied by pain in the bladder region, perineum (between the legs) or in the urethra (tube from the bladder). However this went on much longer than an infection should, and often after taking antibiotics. The lining of the bladder is called the interstitium and so it was thought that when people presented with this group of symptoms they had a chronic infection of the bladder lining. This is how the name Interstitial Cystitis came around.

It’s now understood that Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome is much more complex, and many people do not have a chronic infection of the bladder or urethral lining. Even If they do have a chronic...

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Does a c-section increase your risk of bladder pain?

Watch the vlog here.

A few weeks ago I was given this paper by Gill Brook (thanks Gill!), and I think it’s another important step forwards in our knowledge about the aeteology of Bladder Pain Syndrome.

The full title of the paper is:
Will cesarean section increase the risk of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome?
Kun-Min Chang, Ming-Huei Lee, Hsuan-Hung Lin, Shang-Liang Wu, Huei-Ching Wu
Neurourology and Urodynamics. 2018;1–7.
DOI: 10.1002/nau.23704

Have a listen, I’d love to hear your thoughts! Catch me on Facebook or Twitter.

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How to get into Pelvic Health Physiotherapy

I sat down with Gillian McCabe to discuss how you can get into Pelvic Health Physiotherapy. You can watch our chat here.

Getting a job in pelvic health can be much like working in a pub – you can’t work in a pub til you’ve got experience working in a pub…

And then there’s the question – what do we actually Do in pelvic health?

If you’ve got an inkling that this may be the career for you – hurrah! Congrats. You’ll be hard pressed to find such a rewarding profession.

Gill and I had a chcat about how we got into pelvic health, and how you could too.

Want to find out more? Have a look at the POGP website for the complete role of a Pelvic Health physio and for details of the upcoming workshops, events, and conferences.

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Talking Graded Motor Imagery in Pelvic Pain with Katie Kelly

Watch the vlog here.

Katie and I got chatting online as we both have an interest in graded motor imagery in pelvic pain. Katie works on the East coast of Canada as a pelvic health physiotherapist and is researching graded motor imagery in women with pelvic pain with  Mount Allison Univeristy and Dalhousie University. She’s just completed a Phase 1 trial looking at how women with pelvic pain perceive images, and was kind enough to sit down and chat with me about her research and experience of what works for her in clinic.

It was really interesting to hear what kinds of images they’ve been using, the difficulties in finding images to represent motor and sensory activities for the pelvis, and what tools she uses in clinic.

Apologies for the sound quality, I’m working on it…

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How to train your bladder

Always on the toilet? Always looking out for a toilet? Watch this to stop having to rush back and forth during the day or night.

It’s time to Optimise your Bladder

How does a bladder normally act?

It’s normal to go to the toilet up to 8 times a day and not at all at night unless you’re over the age of 65. Each time you use the toilet you should pass between 200-300mls of urine. Your bladder should be able to comfortably store up to around 600mls, and because of this you should pass a larger volume during your first toilet trip of the day.

What can happen?

The bladder can become irritable or ‘overactive’. This is exacerbated by concern about leakage, irritation and pain. It may also be a result of habit, by emptying the bladder too often during the day. It’s important that you first get this checked out by your doctor, then if appropriate seek help from your local pelvic health physiotherapist.

If the bladder is never allowed to fill to its...

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Prolapse? AVOID these things..

Want to know what to Avoid when you have a prolapse? Watch this.

Pelvic floor muscle exercises are key to managing pelvic organ prolapse symptoms. We know that if you do them three times a day for 3 to 5 months resolves symptoms: your pelvic floor will begin to effectively support your pelvic organs and you’ll no longer have those uncomfortable, bothersome symptoms. The following five main lifestyle factors have also been found to aggravate prolapse symptoms by increasing the pressure in your abdomen. Follow the lifestyle advice guidance below to reduce your risk of prolapses returning.

• Constipation

Constipation is usually caused by dehydration and not enough fibre in your diet. Try to avoid this by ensuring that you eat the recommended ten portions of fruit and vegetables each day. Straining to empty your bowel can make your prolapse worse, so make sure that you adopt the correct position when opening your bowels, and use diaphragmatic breathing as your only...

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How to do pelvic floor muscle exercises

Firstly… No, you don’t have to get on the floor. Click here to Watch How.

And secondly, yes. They are that good. We know that up to 97% of women who do pelvic floor exercises three times a day (to the point of fatigue, not just a wiggle) for 3-5 months will have a COMPLETE RESOLUTION of their Incontinence or Prolapse symptoms.

Compelling, eh? It’s free as well..

So what are you waiting for? Time to get exercising that pelvic floor!

Before we begin, here’s a little disclaimer – it’s important to get a thorough examination from a qualified pelvic health physiotherapist or your doctor. Not all pelvic floor problems are solved by doing pelvic floor exercises – if you have pelvic pain or a tight muscle doing exercises can make things feel worse. Get checked first folks!

How to do the exercises:

Pull in your back passage as if to stop from breaking wind, imagining your anus moving upwards and forwards towards your pubic bone. Although...

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Living with Endometriosis: Believe and Tri

I’m really glad to be able to bring you this fantastic, painfully honest blog by an inspiring Endometriosis survivor and triathlete. I was lucky enough to work with her on her journey back to sport and fitness following surgery. She never failed to inspire me with her grit, determination and gentle self-care. At the end of the day you can’t force your body into behaving a certain way, it has to be guided, cajoled and gently pursuaded. That can be frustrating, but she shows us how with gentle self-care and perserverence great things can be achieved. I’m really looking forward to reading more as her training progresses – you can HERE. And while you’re at it, if you have a few spare pennies please sponsor her Olympic Triathlon in June!

 

My journey has been a bit of odd one really.  I’ve had all the usual stuff of painful heavy awful periods in my teens but was on the pill from 16 which kept things sort of under control.  I was...

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